UnionWorking Podcast

2 - Fi-Core, Part 1

August 26, 2019 UnionWorking Season 1 Episode 2
UnionWorking Podcast
2 - Fi-Core, Part 1
Chapters
00:00:00
Intros
00:01:13
What is Financial Core?
00:03:24
Choosing Fi-Core (Kelly)
00:06:04
Choosing Fi-Core (Lowell)
00:10:07
Podcast Sage
00:11:19
Choosing Fi-Core (Shannon)
00:12:36
War stories of non-union work
00:22:03
Coming back
00:25:30
I don't want to do this anymore
00:28:35
We are taking a break, see you in Part 2!
UnionWorking Podcast
2 - Fi-Core, Part 1
Aug 26, 2019 Season 1 Episode 2
UnionWorking

In our second episode, a two-parter, we sit down with some actors who quit the union, and then wanted to get back in.

UW Voices: Mike Nelson, Kevin Ashworth, and Bob Stephenson

UW Guests: Kelly Pendygraft, Shannon Holmes, and Lowell Northrop

UnionWorking Links:

Guests and Topical Links:

Email us at info@unionworking.com

The UnionWorking Podcast is recorded at Culver City Studios
Executive Producer Jack Levy
http://podcastsage.com / jack@podcastsage.com / 818-233-0640

UnionWorking.com

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In our second episode, a two-parter, we sit down with some actors who quit the union, and then wanted to get back in.

UW Voices: Mike Nelson, Kevin Ashworth, and Bob Stephenson

UW Guests: Kelly Pendygraft, Shannon Holmes, and Lowell Northrop

UnionWorking Links:

Guests and Topical Links:

Email us at info@unionworking.com

The UnionWorking Podcast is recorded at Culver City Studios
Executive Producer Jack Levy
http://podcastsage.com / jack@podcastsage.com / 818-233-0640

UnionWorking.com

Speaker 1:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

and we're rolling on the union working podcast at Culver City studios with podcasts, sage union working as a grassroots organization of film, television and commercial performers of Sag-aftra. We are dedicated to solutions, ideas and creating a union that works for all of us. So we hope you will enjoy our informative, entertaining and at times irreverent podcast about the challenges facing the modern day union actor. We support a membership driven membership up model because we are [inaudible]. Hey, it's Mike Nelson, one of the core members of union working. I'm here with two of my other fellow corps members. We've got Bob Stevenson, Bob Stevenson, and I'm Kevin Ashworth. There they are and we have three incredible guests for what we think is going to be a tremendous two parter. Our first two parter podcast and the Youtube universe. We have three people here to talk about their experience going ficor or Financial Corp. We have first and foremost, Kelly penny graph.

Speaker 2:

Hi everybody. We have little Northrop. Hello and Shannon Holmes. Hi, you're welcome everybody. So first we wanted to lay a little groundwork about what financial core is for people that aren't familiar with. We are all familiar with it, you guys especially, but Kevin, I wanted to ask you, what is your version of the brass tax of what is financial core? What does it mean and how does sag? Revere financial core, so financial core means that you quit Sag-aftra but you still pay fees to access the financial core functions of the union. You give up your membership benefits, but you can pay fees to get contracts equal benefits. Ficor is tricky for Sag-aftra because unlike, well, let's say, let's be clear that financial corp applies to all unions, right? It was a supreme court decision, right? So it's all unions have, this is available to them to get started with the phone company, but if you work for the phone company on Monday, you still work for the phone company on Tuesday.

Speaker 2:

Whereas with this profession, you might have a different employer every day of the week. That's true for any multi-employer professions and Financial Corp has a very different ramification. But frankly, we view financial corp as anti-union or, and some people call it scabs. Yep. And what else should I say about it? Does that cover it? Yeah, I think so because it stems from a supreme court ruling where employees didn't want some of their dues to go towards backing lobbying, lobbying. That's right. Political candidates or you know, like the Democratic Party or you know, George Bush for president and whatnot. So the supreme court was like, yeah, that's unconstitutional. So you can pay fees that go towards collective bargaining, your contracts and stuff like that. And that's the financial core of the union. Correct. The collective bargaining. But the film society is not the financial core of the union. Right. And Sag-aftra does not participate in partisan politics.

Speaker 2:

Right. We don't back candidates or parties with our money. We do, I think do spend some money for [inaudible] to lobby governments for sure. Oh, union stuff. It's like actually AFL CIO, big labor stuff. But we're not giving money to the guy running for school board. Correct. So it is legal to do. It's legal to go financially or our three guests all went financial. Cora, let's just get right into it with our guests and Bob, do you have anything else to say about, no, I think that's great. Excellent. All right, so that's what financial corp is. It is available with you guys. I just wanted to find out where were you guys at in your careers when you started thinking about and then eventually leading to deciding to go financial core. What kind of brought about your, your thinking about that? We'll start with Kelly.

Speaker 3:

Oh, hi. Okay, great. I'm, let's see. I'm really bad at dates, but I believe that I became ficor around 2004 I'm fortunately there was no driving force behind it to leave the union except I was working a lot as a union member and someone had put it in my ear that I would work more because there were more jobs available out there that union people weren't being hired to do and I would be ahead of the competition and therefore would work on both sides.

Speaker 2:

The Best of both worlds. Best of both worlds. There wasn't an agent that put it in your head, was it?

Speaker 3:

It was an agent. [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

cause that's one of my followup questions is was it a fellow actor, an agent or manager or a casting director, or was it a director that wanted you to do a one off non-union movie or something? It's all of those. I've talked to people that all have different experiences. But you had an agent.

Speaker 3:

I believe what had happened was I had heard about it, I asked about it and my agent therefore then said, I think anybody's crazy if they don't do phycor. And I was like, oh great. Yeah. That began the journey and I remember calling sag and having the phone interview, having to write the letter, telling them why I was doing it. And I had said that I felt like I was competing in film and television against people, that I didn't have enough experience to compete. So I was going to get more experience by doing non-union and eventually rejoin the union.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So from the beginning you were thinking like I'm going to do this temporary build up my credits.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. But that was even kind of a lie, you know? Right. I'm here today because this was a poor decision and I speak out about it and it's shameful for me and I just want to maybe do right now,

Speaker 2:

we're glad you're here cause this is what we're going to get into and we'll move on to you. Lol. Same question, but yeah, we're going to get into the reasons why. Because we hear all these same things. Everyone's got these talking points of why they do it or you see groups on Facebook where they get together and I delved into this and found that there was financial card groups and I think there's part of that. You make that decision then you're kind of just like, ah, this is cool. Right. I need to find at least one other person that's like, yeah, yeah you're totally cool. I was like awesome. We're cool together. Like we're both doing this and I don't feel as bad. So there's like looking for community or affirmation. Others too. Cause you kind of know like this feels weird or this is kind of feel right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Yeah. All right. Yeah, so I just was noticing that the union, I'm mostly glad for commercials. I have a commercial agent. I don't have a theatrical agent. Okay. I just was noticing all the union commercials were just drying up. I was like not going on any auditions. And around 2016 it was really getting slow and I'm like, I love going up for commercials. I love booking commercials. I'm kind of missing being in commercials. So I had heard the word Phi core. I've heard of that and of asking around, I had a friend, he goes, Oh yeah, I've been fly corps for 10 years and I book a lot of stuff. You should consider it. Talk to someone else who was like, I call a heavy hitter commercial actor. And he said, it's not for me, but you know you do. You talk to my agent.

Speaker 2:

And she was very objective. She said, you know, if you want to try it, you can. I mean, I know what you mean. Everything is kind of going on union. So if you wanna try it out, I think you have to write a letter to Sag. I wrote a letter sag wrote back and said, you need to turn in your membership card, give us a reason why. And I said, I'm just not getting auditions anymore and I need to make some money. So that was around the end of 2017 I called my agent and said, okay, I'm by Cornell, it's official. The next day I had three auditions. I'm like, Oh wow, this is a well kept secret. Okay. And I think the next day I had like two more additions through. It was like all of a sudden just opened up this sort of secret society and I'm like, man, why didn't I do this sooner?

Speaker 2:

So one of the first gigs I went out for was a regional commercial out of state with a buyout of $7,000 and it was regional restaurant. So it wouldn't really conflict with anything else that, and I'm thinking $7,000 that's like, that's cool. And because it was nonunion, they were going to fly me to at Scottsdale. Awesome. Put me in a room. No, seriously. I mean this is my first nail and you didn't get call them, fly you to Scottsdale, which is Kinda Nice. So like Scottsdale put me in a resort and they're gonna get me for the entire week because they're not paying by the hour. Then there's no overtime. It's just, hey, you're going to be here for a week. And I was fine with that. I have kids I need to [inaudible] I was going to ask you, was part of the reason for your decision to go fight cores because you're married and have kids that yeah, that's definitely part of the pressure of money.

Speaker 2:

Income is definitely increases when you have a wife and kids. So that happened. It was feeling really good about myself. Came back and then the next audition was that I booked was 500 for the day, 1500 I think it was 1500 if you made the cut. Pretty common numbers. And I'm like, all right, well it's just one of those. I'm sure I'll get another one's big by, you know, buyouts and it shot on a Sunday. And so I'm like, my wife's pissed that I'm not, you know, just like, what is this union? Don't know. It's not, but it's money. Trust me, this is just a little dental scale. It's Sunday. Yeah. No, wait, no. You know, and it was a, it was a, it was a crappy shoot. I don't think it ever aired. I never seen it. So that's 100 bucks per Sunday and having to drive up to like Northridge or something.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And I think everything after that was like 500 for the day, a thousand if it errors, or 15 nothing beyond that. And then there was a lot of spokesman roles coming up and I don't like spokesman roles. That's not my thing. But it would be like two pages of copy. You're gonna be a spokesman for this product and it's $6,000 buy out. Can I mention the company in perpetuity? Sure. We know there was one company that the spokesperson for this travel website, maybe they'll sponsor a podcast, is that actor, I don't know his name, but he's kind of Trivago. Okay, here you go. Yeah, we're thinking it. So that came down the barrel. Yeah. Whatever you call it. Come in Kim on the tube there, a pipeline, any kind of things. It was for the spokesman and the buyout was not great. And I'm thinking he wants you're that person. Yeah, you're not, you're that person. Everyone's going to think of you. You're done. And everyone's going to think you're making a thousand billion dollar dollar [inaudible] flow. Yeah. So I told my agent, I'm like, I'm not, I'm not going to do it. And she was fine with it. I'm great agent. All right, we're going to pin it there cause we're going to get to all your life,

Speaker 4:

all the, all the stuff you got to do as by car. Cause that's part of the big discussion. Yeah. Hi, it's Jack Levy, producer of the union working podcast and partner at podcasts age as an awarded audio producer who's contributed to some of the finest feature films, television shows, video games, and records produced. I had been inundated with requests by peers and major studios alike to produce and manage podcast production and I'd be delighted to do the same for you. Have an idea for a podcast and don't know where to start or who to call. Look no further. Have a scripted podcast, investigative or documentary interview show, Solo cast game show, talk show, or literally any other project. Give me a call at (818) 233-0640 that's (818) 233-0640 or email me at Jack at podcast, sage.com we have world-class studios here in Culver City and can work remote on location, literally anywhere and have the broadband experience to help with everything from concept development to recording and editing, staffing and writers and of course music. Call me at (818) 233-0640 or shoot me an email at jacket podcast. sage.com mention you and you're working and get a 10% discount. Hell I'll make it 15 and now back to union, working with Trivago. That does make sense. Cause they couldn't even afford to give the guy a belt. Wasn't that a big thing?

Speaker 2:

I didn't wear a shirt tucked in and Nobel. And you're like what is this? The most recent one I saw, I had some pretty bad scene partner for him too. Oh Man. Yeah. New New wardrobe department cleaner. Yeah. And we'll go to Shannon again. Like where were you in your career when you made the decision or who influenced you to make the decision if anybody.

Speaker 5:

Yeah, I, I've, I've been listening to you guys talk about it and I was thinking like who influenced me and it just the dumb little voice in my head that influenced me. I talked and I didn't do a whole lot of research on it and talked a lot of people about it. I just talked to my agent about it and he said, it's your decision. I won't submit you for any nonunion stuff. So just leave my name off of it. If you're going to go do that,

Speaker 2:

yeah, you're on your own in that world

Speaker 5:

pretty much. But the reason that I wanted to do it is because I run sessions for commercials and I just started seeing like the percentage of auditions that weren't on union. So there was a lot more, but a lot of crappy ones. But in like two months, I saw three different jobs from three different casting offices. That was a nonunion, something average buyout was like 45 grand. I'm like, Holy Shit. And I wasn't ficor yet by that time, the third one. And I was right for it and I'm like, son of a bitch and I just did it and then I haven't seen anything like that since or no one of the time. And it was just for like a small company, Mercedes

Speaker 2:

[inaudible], Mercedes Benz [inaudible] these rules nail [inaudible].

Speaker 5:

So I realized when I uh, I had submitted to rejoin a sag, they asked, how long have you been phycor? And I'm like, I thought like, oh, I think it was like three years. It was six.

Speaker 2:

Oh Wow.

Speaker 5:

Like, I didn't go out for a lot of stuff. None of it seemed worth it

Speaker 2:

was part of your decision, your a session runner. So you see everything, you see every actor in town, you see the good, the bad and the ugly. And was part of your decision was I run sessions for some nonunion stuff and I see who my competition is to and where you like I should hold my own. Yeah.

Speaker 5:

It really sucks when a couple of nine union that I would go on and uh, I didn't get a call back.

Speaker 2:

[inaudible] that was bad for your psyche and your confidence. Like oh no, I'm looking for great actors in general. They're looking for good enough. I'm not a great actor, I can do that.

Speaker 5:

Uh, so that was kind of my decision to go ficor I switched agents from the, the good guy that uh, didn't want me to do nonunion work, got a different agent and they were just kind of obscure and they're just awful. And I had told them I only want to go on non union jobs that are decent. And so they started submitting me for jobs that they thought were decent relative to everything that they're seeing, so they would send me on the better ones and like a $2,000 total. I'm like, no, no, that's [inaudible].

Speaker 2:

Yeah, like that was a decent back getting 20% sometimes 40 40% on the nonunion thing cause there's the double dipping. I don't think a lot of people know that agents take 20 to 40% they take 20% and then 20% from the actor and it's definitely a trend we've seen. Yeah.

Speaker 5:

That the non-union payments are going down.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I've said that to people I've had discussions with about ficor or nonunion in general and I'm like, if the union goes away, do you think our wages go up or down? That's an easy answer. Yeah. They're going down and down without, without the union contracts and having some sort of bar or ceiling or floor or whatever on all the stuff and protections. It's like they don't, a lot of, a lot of producers don't find value in it. It's important to interject that the best of the nonunion world is as good as it is because of the union. Right, right. They know the norms that get set on set after Saturday set. If they want to get a spokesman for Trivago, they know they can't do $500 and that's it. They're like, we gotta do six grand or whatever because again, they know that at least to get the caliber of person to speak English with articulate, we'll also spend for that.

Speaker 2:

I think it's kind of scary too, cause I think they sometimes do that to lure off the card guys. Totally. So if they throw out a big, they might get a big fish, right? Yeah. Those Unicorn jobs that, you know, the people talk about where it's like, Oh, it was 25 grand buyout. Um, I'll dip my toe in that. I think that's part of it too, is trying to lure like we'll get someone, we'll get psi or directors or producers reach out to their actor friends and be like, come on. It's just shoots and you know, and shoots in Toronto or chicken in Mexico City. Just do this one, one job. But again, a lot of the times we talk about it, those unicorn jobs are in perpetuity or there for five years. So I saw one for Audi. It's like, again, Audi doesn't have the money to to pay like what?

Speaker 2:

But it was like, it was over five years, so it was like 30 grand over five years. Okay, that's six grand a year. Okay. Give half of it to your agents and the tax man, that's three grand a year. You made on that Audi job you took and now you can't do a car commercial for the next five years. Is that the big category? And it's like, I'd be so screwed. Is that my thing? My thing, I'd be so screwed if I was at the wheel, how? Yes it is. Yeah. Drove the minivan for three grand a year. That would be really be your terrible. Yeah. Well another thing is is you're not getting any pension and health from those jobs. You're getting no money that goes towards a pension credit or health insurance. So,

Speaker 3:

so I'm so sorry. I know the crazy thing about it too that I was finding when I was on these sets is that everybody around you is union. Yeah. Yeah. All of the crew, all of the producers, everybody, they're all union except for you. And it's a really, you know, you can't help but feel like you've been taken advantage of.

Speaker 5:

Yeah. My experience on set the same exact thing. Uh, like just the talent are the only people that are non union, but because they're used to working on union jobs, you'd kind of get treated. At least my experience mostly the same except when it comes to filling out the paperwork and stuff. Like if I have a question or anything, they just, yeah, nope, you agree to this, you've read to this, you have to sign it. Wow. What can I talk to my agent? Well, if you have to, but not really. Wow. Yeah. So did that happen quite a bit too? Like twice, but then the one I realized like fuck, I did sign off on going into the audition. Yeah. I look at it wrong when I went, yeah. I am a contract

Speaker 3:

changed on me for a company. Can I say the colors?

Speaker 2:

Oh, I know your seniors. They're doing great. [inaudible] they're still around. [inaudible] they're allowed to do now. [inaudible]

Speaker 3:

but I remember being in the trailer, looking at the contract, looking at the rate and having the audition notice with the rate on my phone that I originally went in to audition for that rate cause I wouldn't have gone in otherwise. Right. And I could have caused a big stink about it. I didn't, I called my agent and instead I was told not to cause a big stink about it. They called casting, casting said, look, we know Kim, let's just let this one kind of slide. It's like, I'll give you the balance.

Speaker 2:

How much was the difference from [inaudible]? Geez, that's not nothing. And your agent said they'd give you the thousand dollars.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. I mean I don't.

Speaker 2:

Wow.

Speaker 3:

Um, but

Speaker 2:

cause we're getting the 20% so we first [inaudible] we're getting paid for. That's 40% cooling. Suddenly the terms change down. They lure you in with a rate that will get you in the door to audition to get the caliber of actor. That'll be like, all right, I'll do this for five grand or whatever. And then, yeah, when you're in a, we've heard a lot in the like, like people going, okay, you're going to get to do this spot. We'll fly up to San Francisco, then you get to San Francisco. It's like, oh no, no, no. It's like nine spots and it's just for the same price.

Speaker 5:

Exactly. What happened to me, it for a fidelity smiley and there were four commercials on the contract. I'm like, I scratched out and just circle the one in initial this one only. And they, they looked at it, the, the second idea, looked at it and then, uh, let me see, let me come back.

Speaker 2:

Did they ask you that Shannon, were you in the union before? No person that's just not in union with them. Ever knew. Never had this problem. Right.

Speaker 5:

Well, and they came back and said, no, that's fine. Okay. But they're like, we're tried to, cause they would've cut it up into different [inaudible].

Speaker 2:

Yeah. That's the thing that sucks too is there's nowhere for you guys to turn other than your agents. If you have an agent or a manager you can be like, Hey I'm getting screwed over here. And they're like, yeah that's too bad. I'm getting 20% [inaudible] you cross those off too. If they cut it up and put you in other spots, your recourse to go after them. Would you know what I mean? Like would you go with my little crossed out commercials? Initial little thing hold up. Yeah. You don't have a lot of backing, especially without a union to chase them. Right. So when you guys petitioned, cause you have to petition to leave the union, did you have to turn in your card or you didn't like I was

Speaker 5:

anticipating a lot of pushback and probably part of me was kind of hoping I'd be talked out of it in a way, but it was like, okay, you need to do this. And it was a simple thing and I didn't, I don't mind. Maybe I did have to turn my car, but he thought they'd make you put it in a shredder as I'm like, just metaphorically t. Uh, I was thinking that that might be like a, I don't know, like a, like a micro counselor or something like that, just to kind of say, here's what you should really consider the, uh, these points before you go. We're not going to stop you from doing it, but it's the, you're hurting yourself. And it felt more like just calling to like disconnect night cable.

Speaker 2:

Oh, okay. And you guys feel the same thing? I think I got a letter that was a little scary. Okay. I said, we might not let you back in. Yeah. You're doing this on your own accord and you know, you might not come back. Okay. Uh, but I had never heard of that happening before and I was like, you know, I'm gonna keep paying my dues. I'm paying my membership dues. Let me just try this out. Yeah. And, uh, cause we've heard that, we've heard that the unions, you know that's one of their, their goals is one not to talk about ficor a lot cause they don't want word to get out that this is available for actors. I say listen to this spot. Yeah, I disagree with that. I think we need to be, I think it's important that we talk about it and I agree get it out in the open but we've also heard that yeah it's like Ooh they get a stern talking to and they get told all these things and I'm like oh that's not going to be probably great for your career and like we, we don't necessarily have to let you back ever.

Speaker 2:

Like this is supposed to be a decision that could be for good. You are a nonmember. You are regarded as a fees paying nonmember in a scab and parentheses like you are a scab. No. Coming back in. Am I jumping too far ahead? No, no, no. Is that it? Was that, what was that experience like compared to that? Or Kelly, what was your again, you talk really?

Speaker 3:

Gee, I came in when Aftra merged with sag, so it was automatic. It just,

Speaker 5:

so you only went to ficor in sag and you were still after a member?

Speaker 3:

Yes. Yes.

Speaker 2:

So when they merged, you were automatically,

Speaker 3:

I was automatically inducted back in. I had stopped doing non-union, um, probably two years prior because I had just had it. So I took myself off of that list.

Speaker 2:

And for anybody who is ficor right now, you can make that choice right now. You don't have to audition. Anybody. Don't have to wait until you get your, I had a friend that did that. Right. Right. Now he, he had a commercial that ran most of last football season and he was in multiple spots and it was, uh, it was, uh, I thought he, I thought it was union, the big company. I was like, aw man, how great. He's like, dude, that was not union. And I was like, hmm. You're corny. Is like, yeah. But after that he told his agent like, no more. He's, he's petitioned to come back in as well, so that's good. But that one was just a huge, just that that killed him where he was excited that this was going to be great and all he got was just overexposed cause he was every weekend, incessant on Saturday and Sundays and he got that crappy buyout.

Speaker 3:

Kind of happened with me. I started, I remember I went in for a commercial with Jeff Rosenman and I saw him, he's like, I came in for this American Express commercial and I was, hey, oh my God, thank you so much for calling me. And like I was in a desperate place and he's like, Kelly, I'm seeing you everywhere. I haven't called you in because you're a little overexposed. And I was like, wow. Everything came crashing down. And like that was the moment I thought, what am I doing? This is not the direction that I want my career to go in. I didn't move here and leave my family 3000 miles back east to come and be

Speaker 2:

not get paid to be there. Cleaning those non union commercials are to meet the Queen of ficor acting you have, which no one picks up and be overexposed without the compensation. Right. But like artistic recognition, right? Yeah. That's one of the core concepts of the union contract exposure, right? Yeah. Yeah. But what were we just talking about? Overexposure. And then she came back in through because of the merger with [inaudible] about where am I screeners, which is on every one. That's question 12 where are my screeners? But one thing I wanted to touch on before we get to you guys coming back in is what was the moment that was the moment for you that I wanted to know of like, you're in, you're a ficor actor. We're rolling. That's okay. It's fine for rolling. Yeah. 70 west, everybody. He's in here podcast where we keep it real. We're talking. Yeah, we were just good. We were almost solving the issue and you just ruined it with your face. A face for radio. Kevin West. Is there a moment? Years was that moment of being told you're overexposed. That's why I'm not bringing you in for any auditions. We, yikes. Um, did you guys have any, what was, can you remember a moment where you're like, I don't, I don't want to do this anymore. Several of those moms

Speaker 5:

months and then in a shitty agent that kept tended to only submit me for ficor stuff because I was there five quarters.

Speaker 2:

Okay. We hear that a lot from people is that you think you're going to supplement your union income with your non union income. We're just going to add, I'm just going to add some nonunion jobs on top of my union earnings. And you become, you become the Goto nonunion actor for those like Unicorn jobs or those not unicorn jobs there for

Speaker 5:

your agent or for medical testing often too. So that's why you made casting look good, right? When you walk in there like you're sad gag, a big actor, good actor and they're like, oh yeah, look who I can bring in on the [inaudible], right? Yeah, yeah, yeah. For some reason then they don't bring in on the union jobs. So it was just like a combination of I've just getting not enough auditions for union work and I see that they're there and I'm watching TV with everyone that I auditioned with in a commercial and I didn't even audition for it. Right. Or it years ago. It used to be like, I remember well he got a good fam but now it's like I didn't even fucking read for that. So That's interesting. Usually the cat, even the cashing directors. Yeah. You become their nonunion people and they don't want to put you in the union. They keep you over here.

Speaker 2:

Wow. As actors we have to in good faith we have to rely on what we hope our agents are doing and what the casting directors are doing. So when you find out that of like, oh no, these two gatekeepers that are have a huge sway in my opportunities. Yeah. Think of me this way. Yikes. It was kind of a slow dawning on me of that. And the last nonunion job I did was that fidelity one and it was, it was just shit. And it's like a fucking free year. I, I'm re if I went off I would just, it would be be just filled with profanities. Yeah. Well we're going to take a break pretty soon. Maybe we can [inaudible] as we, as we take our break and we'll leave you with Shannon Holmes diatribe, but it just was so stupid and now just fucked. I can't audition for financial services for [inaudible] financial services.

Speaker 2:

So that's three years. You said a three, but that's again like financial services. That's such a like canopy. Oh yeah. Well and especially I've, I've aged myself out of a young dad roles and now I'm old. I had no medium aged dad. I figured just to kind of jumped to now I'm like a financial guy and I'm almost into like pharmaceutical. Oh yes. You know like that. And then matching tubs with your why, getting intimate and separate tubs. It's weird. Are Big for like regular people like, like that sort of thing. Yeah. That's great. All right. Lowell, did you have a serious series of events or an event that you were like, we can do the top of part two? I think we need to take a break. Oh, sure. So let's, let's, let's come back to lower on the top of part to reintroduce and we do have a little bit of a thing to end with. Yes. So I just want to make sure everybody knows that we're just gabbing. We're not official. Korea friend is the official manager of Financial Corp at Sag after her phone number is (323) 549-6019 there's a lot of information on Sag-aftra dot org about that. That is [inaudible]

Speaker 4:

additional information and everything we've said is good stuff, but it's unofficial. That's our opinion. Follow us@unionworkingonfacebookandourwebsiteunionworking.com this podcast is bruised in association with podcast sage. Jack at Culver City Studios. Make hydrogen arrest. Same shot. Make sure to download the next episode. I'd like to thank blue microphones. There. Mikes are fantastic in their headphones. Killer, the gator case company. Your equipment can travel in style, protect your investments. Presonus I just love their studio live series, the Rhode Corporation, the filmmaker kits, ambisonic microphone and recorders. All rock. And of course Tascam the model 24 has been amazing. Need music for a podcast, television project, film, audio book, or any other production. I suggest you call my friends at spirit production music. You can find them and listen to their music at spirit production, music.com representing over 50 music libraries and over 200,000 tracks. Spirit production music has all the music you'll need staff to help and prices. You'll love. Email them through their website or give them a call today at (818) 508-2040 that's (818) 508-2040 ask for my Buddy Ryan. They'll personally help you find the right music for your project. Spirit production, music.com check them out. You'll be thrilled.

Intros
What is Financial Core?
Choosing Fi-Core (Kelly)
Choosing Fi-Core (Lowell)
Choosing Fi-Core (Shannon)
War stories of non-union work
Coming back
I don't want to do this anymore
We are taking a break, see you in Part 2!