UnionWorking Podcast

3 - Fi-Core, Part 2

August 30, 2019 UnionWorking Season 1 Episode 3
UnionWorking Podcast
3 - Fi-Core, Part 2
Chapters
00:00:00
And we're back in Part 2!
00:01:12
What was the moment you wanted to come back?
00:02:43
How did you feel about being Fi-Core?
00:06:25
Shining some light on it
00:12:23
Podcast Sage
00:13:34
And we're back in part two of Part 2!
00:14:15
Coming back (Lowell)
00:16:46
Coming back (Shannon)
00:19:41
How does it feel to be back?
00:24:06
Your advice?
00:27:02
Closing remarks and thanks
UnionWorking Podcast
3 - Fi-Core, Part 2
Aug 30, 2019 Season 1 Episode 3
UnionWorking

In our third episode, we continue a two-part conversation with three actors who quit the union, and then wanted to get back in.

UW Voices: Mike Nelson, Kevin Ashworth, and Bob Stephenson

UW Guests: Kelly Pendygraft, Shannon Holmes, and Lowell Northrop

UnionWorking Links:

Guests and Topical Links:

Email us at info@unionworking.com

The UnionWorking Podcast is recorded at Culver City Studios
Executive Producer Jack Levy
http://podcastsage.com / jack@podcastsage.com / 818-233-0640

UnionWorking.com

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In our third episode, we continue a two-part conversation with three actors who quit the union, and then wanted to get back in.

UW Voices: Mike Nelson, Kevin Ashworth, and Bob Stephenson

UW Guests: Kelly Pendygraft, Shannon Holmes, and Lowell Northrop

UnionWorking Links:

Guests and Topical Links:

Email us at info@unionworking.com

The UnionWorking Podcast is recorded at Culver City Studios
Executive Producer Jack Levy
http://podcastsage.com / jack@podcastsage.com / 818-233-0640

UnionWorking.com

Speaker 1:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

And we're rolling on the union working podcast at Culver City Studios with Podcast Sage. UnionWorking is a grassroots organization of film, Television and commercial performers of Sag-aftra. You're dedicated to solutions, ideas, and creating a union that works for all of us, so we hope you'll enjoy our informative, entertaining and hopefully irreverent podcast about the challenges facing the modern day union actor. We support a membership driven membership up model because

Speaker 3:

[inaudible].

Speaker 4:

That is correct. Now starting part two of our episode regarding financial core or by core a where we left off before we were talking about these three guests. We have Kelly Pendergraph, Lowell, Northrop. Hello Shannon Holmes. I am Mike C. Nelson. I am one of the core members of union working and we have a two other corps members here. We have Bob Stevenson and Bob [inaudible]

Speaker 3:

and Kevin Ashworth and I am Kevin Ashworth and we're appreciative for our three guests. Doing a good brief thing today. Yeah,

Speaker 4:

so thankful for you guys being here with us to day. So where we left off, we were talking about what was the moment that you wanted to come back to the union. What was a series of events or an event that you can remember? So we talked to Kelly and Shannon and episode one. So we left off with Lowell. Was there a one event or a series of events where you're like,

Speaker 3:

just a series of getting auditions. They weren't paying well, they're just crap. So I just was getting sick of that. So I moved a little further away from, you know, still I could make the commute, but it was going to take a lot more for me to want to drive the extra 45 minutes hour to get to an audition. And I'm not going to do that for something that pays 500 bucks or 1000 bucks. So I honestly, I kind of dipped my toe into the whole ficor thing. I didn't do it for very long. So I think 2017 2018 and then by early 2018 as I tried to reach out to sag and say, Hey, I want back in, I'm not liking it. And I like in this ficor bullshit. It was just these, these crappy paying gigs and then this a lot of spokesman roles a lot.

Speaker 3:

And it was like, Hey, and you know, memorize that, copy it open the pdf. It'd be like four pages of just, and I'm like, I'm not doing this for $1,000. Yeah. Cause I'm not good with words or I'm not good with that many words. So I'm good with like the [inaudible] and go like, yeah, I'm good with the [inaudible] give me a line. Yeah. Face acting. I can, I can do the face acting and then like one or two lines, you know, you gonna even me. Four pages of copy. You better pay me the big bucks right now. Serious. You three guys. When you were five court, did you feel Kelly's a lady? That's true. You two guys, that's three gals [inaudible] to come on. What all ladies? Um, did you feel a weird

Speaker 4:

about being ficor, did that have anything to do with your decision as well or was it like a money thing or it was like these bad jobs? Did you feel weird about like your other friends and cohorts and other actors that you were like, I'm Kinda doing this and did you feel like you couldn't talk to them openly and honestly about it or you didn't want to let on that you were ficor ah,

Speaker 5:

yes. Oh my God, I was so embarrassed. I remember going in and hiding, signing in to auditions, seeing all the people that I know over here, sitting in, in front of this doorway, number one. And I'm a doorway number two and I'm like trying to blend in with them. Like I am going in that room. So embarrassing guys. Oh yeah. I had so much shame and I never told people if I did I would kind of like measure the temperature on whether I should say it or not because I was embarrassed completely.

Speaker 6:

I've owned it right away, but I didn't go out for it. Cause I had the agent for quite a while. He wouldn't have his name on a nonunion stuff and so it would be just things what I would be working and the casting director would have another room or something that I was running that was non United. Ask what the rate was and stuff. They'd say, Oh, you should go in for it. I'm like, oh, that's kind of a shitty rate. Okay.

Speaker 3:

It didn't seem like it was very couple of guys. Right. But then it also kind of just dwindled. It started feeling just shitty. But that was scabbing.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, cause we've heard from some people, some people are unabashed and don't care. They're like, I want to act when I want to. You can't tell me otherwise. They listen to this podcast. They're not going to care like they have it rationalized. But more of the people that we've seen come back, you guys included in some of our friends have felt that shame just felt icky. It felt shitty. I didn't like doing this anymore.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. In fact, a friend of mine was ficor early this year and he encouraged somebody else not to do it.

Speaker 4:

Oh, that's great. He was reinstated. Ban Plastic.

Speaker 6:

When I talked to you, Bob, we were talking about your union. You're working into that, talking about how I've started the process of coming back and I saw just Jolie on your face. Oh yeah. But then you had told me no, there, there, there are a lot of people in the union that know that you're ficor, but you'd probably don't know that you're [inaudible]. And I'm like, cause I know,

Speaker 3:

oh, I didn't know that.

Speaker 4:

Oh, I didn't know. Sweet. We know we not go well. Again, we have friends that are in casting that are agents, managers run session so they can see and be like, oh, I saw so and so doing. I knew it for a long time, but I hadn't said anything either. So there was really sweet when it came up, it just popped up by chance.

Speaker 3:

I knew you were. And you know why is you got a job that I was on avail for, but I was like, no way. He's ficor. There's no way because they consider you like a heavy hitter. I think you're what? A Dick. You were just a little bit better than me that day. Oh yeah. No, but I was very surprised cause I was like maybe they went union on this one. It was a grilling thing. But yeah, when I saw the sod air and I saw you, I really thought there's no way because you are, you are, you were a heavy hitter. You're a guy who books a lot.

Speaker 5:

I would be on set, I recall two different times it was on set where the director would come up to me and say, you're all great. Why are you non-union? Well I'm not, and then you have to go into the explanation of that whole thing. But I think they're also, you know, there is a level of talent that they think they're going to get and that they should get if they're going to make their job. Nonunion. Sure. You know, it's like we're making our talents. We work at what we do, we're professionals and we come with a level of professionality when we go to work. And they should pay for that. Yeah, sorry.

Speaker 7:

No your words. No, but that, that is what that is. Right. And he's like, there's a whole outing campaign from a guy on Twitter, Ralph Mathers, and we don't know who this person is, but yeah, he'll put up scab of the week and he'll just throw up people who are doing, so he put a big name up there. I don't know if I need to say his name, but he put a big name up there and it exploded. And it was, I mean there was probably 150 things going. Yeah, go on. Going off on him. And I had reposted it so everyone thought it came from [inaudible] Wayne saying, I know this guy really well. Yeah. And but it's a good thing. But it was yet then what happened was, it was exactly what you were saying is that a session runner said to him, you know why we're pissed at you? Because when you're doing a nonunion thing, I've been in the room when you come in the room and when you leave the room, every producer behind us is if we can get this kind of talent, why don't we do everything now? Yeah, exactly. That's what we all told them. Like, this is your fucking right,

Speaker 4:

rob, when you're not getting paid for your scrutiny, everybody, I go do that lessons at for every year on my slate choice, and that's it. That's where you're right. If your needs meet the month that we, the strength of sag-aftra comes from the ability to withhold talents. That's it. Right? Yeah, it's true. And again, like that's our biggest leverage. If you want to use Tom Hanks or you want to use Kelly as a spokesman for your thing, it's like you've got to pay a rate. You've got to pay a rate that's worthy of their talent. [inaudible] business folks, right? Yeah. You've got to pay rate. We've all worked with directors and it's like, I've talked with them about this and we're like, how is it to cast non-union? Oh, their heads go back. Their eyes roll and they're like, oh my loss and her, it takes more time. So they're paying for, like we got to casting, they don't pay casting that much money. So castings working longer, like you're running longer sessions where you're seeing 200 people in like a day, which is obscene. Yeah. For a horrible Tom, the actors, the talent isn't there and you're doing multiple days or multiple rooms. Just the whole thing is like race to the bottom. Yeah. It's a vicious cycle. It's not good

Speaker 5:

really quickly. Did this person that was on, um, Twitter and being called out, have you spoken to him? Does he speak out about it? Would he come and be on the podcast?

Speaker 7:

No, but he defends it. But he did recently post something that was kind of, he said that he realizes he's being a little bit narcissistic and then he's gonna get off Facebook and he needs some time to kind of like look at his own life, not necessarily just this, which was wonderful and kind of cool. So I haven't,

Speaker 4:

the interesting thing that that really would be that initial exposure of this by whoever this was on Twitter and then it went on Facebook and it was part of this dad's Facebook group. It was because again, like we're shining some light on it. We're talking about it now as adults and there was a lot of people that were rationalizing things or people that were coming to his aid and other people that were taking him down a million pegs, but it was a great discourse of just exposing like some people didn't know what financial core is. They didn't know that. It was like we should get rid of it section. Get rid of fine core. You're like, you can't, what if we were in court? Can't do it. This guy was working off the card for a long time. Right. Only recently when phycor and claimed, oh, I just did it November.

Speaker 4:

It's like we know you literally in the room, we have photos of him working off the car and you know, we know you've been wearing it. I've got for a long time. Right. Yeah, that's what I mean. I think the rationale, his head is still sort of defending, you know, not sure. Yeah, and we're doing a great job in terms of organizing employers and the new contract and all sorts of things are happening, but it's always been the case that is not just organizing employers. It's organizing the hackers on some of the actors, peer-to-peer. And I think we're all in this together. A lot of like your friend coming back, a couple of my friends coming back reached out and said, seeing your stuff on social media or just having a conversation with you at an audition is the reason I started thinking about things differently and not yelling at them or castigating anybody or telling them, oh, you're in the union over. It's like, yeah, you are. You're screwing your own future. You're screwing my future. You're screwing the union's future. So it's like, what did you move out here for? You moved down here to be an actor in films, TV, animation, voiceovers, like as a professional and to make your living doing that. Right? That's why you moved to the mind. We you in a Supercuts thing years ago

Speaker 5:

I was in a fantastic,

Speaker 7:

fantastic sams. Yeah. Was that union or was that you can you use as a first time I ever saw you and I was like, this girl's fucking unbelievable. Like I was like, this girl is so good and I would have thought that was a union job because of that. Honestly heavy. It was a huge job. It was you, you were right that you had all this heavy lifting. Yeah. Yeah. It was amazing

Speaker 5:

characters seeing myself and with five different hairstyles. Yeah. And I will also say I had two days of wig fitting. They transformed my own hair and colored and gave me extensions. And then I had to really negotiate to get them to allow me to go back to the salon with treatments because my hair was so damaged. So after, so that job paid $8,000 yeah. And you know, everybody was lovely because it was a very professional shoe professional crew.

Speaker 7:

That was sort of the early days of localize of like nonunion stuff too, right? Yeah. Cause you get, yeah.

Speaker 4:

Paid for your wig fittings.

Speaker 5:

I think it was all lumped in there together

Speaker 4:

because that's another thing that you go on some of these sets too and you're like, oh yeah, fitting no money for wardrobe fitting. Yeah,

Speaker 7:

right. I remember seeing that. I remember seeing you in that. Go on. I've never seen this go. This is incredible cause you had to play all these different pie was one vitals at mine. That's some heavy lifting going on there and I thought it was union for sure. That's why I went to ask [inaudible]

Speaker 5:

in my mind about doing hair stuff actually because I had scabs in my hair from all the pinning they were doing from each wig because you know they would have to take it out every five minutes.

Speaker 3:

Hello. Sorry, I just want to say real quick. No, it wasn't just like the crappy pay that got me to not want to keep doing it. My core. It's like what you said when I kind of learned from I think from the Facebook page was that by doing these nonunion jobs I was really kind of fucking everyone over because like you said, if you have these really good actors going on in the room and then they're usually union, they're walking out know non union spots and the producer's going, you know, we could get these really good actors for next to nothing and I just feel like that just is adding up. It's adding onto it

Speaker 2:

problem and I just didn't want to be part of that problem. Hi, it's Jack Levy, producer of the union working podcast and partner at podcast sage as an awarded audio producer who's contributed to some of the finest feature films, television shows, video games and records produced. I've been inundated with requests by peers and major studios alike to produce and manage podcast production and I'd be delighted to do the same for you. Have an idea for a podcast and don't know where to start or who to call. Look no further. Have a scripted podcast, investigative or documentary interview show, Solo cast, game show, talk show, or literally any other project. Give me a call at (818) 233-0640 that's (818) 233-0640 or email me at Jack at podcasts, sage.com we have world-class studios here in Culver City and can work remote on location literally anywhere and have the broadband experience to help with everything from concept development to recording and editing, staffing and writers and of course music. Call me at (818) 233-0640 or shoot me an email at jacket podcast, sage.com mention you and your working and get a 10% discount. Hell, I'll make it 15 and now back to union working and a lot of people will rationalize it as like, that's just me. I'm doing a couple of these on this.

Speaker 3:

I'm like, if we have a few thousand people thinking that way. Exactly, exactly. But yeah, we're giving talent away at a discount. Bottom line, you're giving producers talent for no money leaving seemed relatively easy. Not a ton of pushback, maybe a scary letter or whatever. So we've heard that. But what was your process like? We heard Kelly got back in with the merger. You were, you were, um, you had left sag. She was after, after son Sag and after merged you were automatically just kind of grandfathered in like, oh, I'm back in the union. What was the process like to, to come back into the union? I think it was the beginning of 2018 I wrote a letter to Sag saying, I want to rejoin. I've been paying my dues by coer world has not been great. Let me back in. I didn't hear anything back. And I was like, hmm.

Speaker 3:

So then I called them and I spoke to a really nice woman. I don't remember her name, and she said, Oh, I think we have her paperwork. We'll get back to you shortly. I think it was a committee coming up and they were going to vote. So I didn't realize there was a whole voting process to let me back in. Then, uh, someone sent me a questionnaire that had to fill out. Why did you leave the union? How many jobs did you book? How much did you make off those jobs? Again, I think only had two or three. So I and I ended up been doing it for that long. And then I also mentioned you, hey, hey. Yeah, just drop Mike Mills in them there. How's your check? Did I mentioned your name? Amen. Because we started talking on Facebook and you really can to speak. This is a really good idea to get back in. I gotta do it and I was all for it. So the question, Ian and I just got my card like I think a week or a week ago. Two ago. Yeah. The only bummer is it ha. It says my membership started. She has thousand 19 [inaudible].

Speaker 3:

Exactly. I know I'm scab does, it starts over. It starts over. I did not know that. Oh, they also wanted me to add a professional name option. If there was another little Northrop in most, you could lose your [inaudible]. You could use [inaudible] Northrop. I thanks pretty safe.

Speaker 6:

Well, you could put like the fourth.

Speaker 3:

I am the fourth. Oh, I'm not going to, I was going to put it, but yeah, I'm the fourth [inaudible]. Yeah. Um, my dad was, he knew that in my head. [inaudible] we're gonna slate. I always, you know, I don't, uh, charge you more money to give back. Yeah. You have to pay a reinstatement fee. And they just, uh, it wasn't it back dues or anything or no, just no, cause I was paying dues. But you kind of pay a reinitiation initiation. Yeah. And it was worth it. The ficor dues. How much different are they, are they, when they say, well, you're only paying the core, is it like a big difference? There is, you can take a lesser percentage for your dues. I never did that. I was like, you know, I love Sag. I'm gonna pay full. Do I paid full? It's like that. It's like 3%. That's what I, that's what I think it is. It's 97% of your regular, it just adds up for the cost of the film society and all the expenses of the union are the core financial expenses. For some reason that made me feel that you're legit. So Shannon, what was your experience coming back in

Speaker 6:

nonunion job that I did, I had decided I'm not doing anymore non union work and I'm getting rid of those fucking agent. Uh, and so I started asking around like, what agency, uh, would a different casting directors recommend? Like, who's busy, who's hungry, who would it be a fit with? Sorry, I got in touch with, uh, a new agent and uh, she liked me and it was great, but she doesn't take nonunion talent. I'm like, okay,

Speaker 3:

I'm not so,

Speaker 6:

but uh, she said that she was working with sag about getting ficor actors we joining. So we stayed in touch and she was still helping me. She kept me updated with her progress in that. But then it ended up being well with the new contract starting, I think there's become a back burner thing right now. But why don't I take you anyway, men, well, we'll book you a union job and then you can pay your initiation fee. I'm like, great. Well that hasn't happened yet.

Speaker 3:

[inaudible]

Speaker 6:

so it's very similar to locals. I did get a response right away. I called and spoke to, you said the new boyfriend, the boyfriend friend or spoke at her office. I'm not sure exactly if I spoke to her or not. So it just got the ball rolling and I sent a little thing I wish to come back and they sent out the questionnaire just like Lowell said, filled that out. Uh, judge and Mike, a question. I see that,

Speaker 4:

oh they're going to take a little longer. Might be awhile.

Speaker 6:

But I sent it back in and they wrote back and said you didn't have to mention anyone.

Speaker 4:

No. [inaudible] Mike's just making everyone do that.

Speaker 6:

I don't when it went to committee and it was voted and so I've got my letter saying, welcome back. You will have to pay your full initiation fee because you were out of sag for six years. Okay.

Speaker 4:

And then you'll get your card. And then

Speaker 6:

I guess I just haven't paid it yet cause I get it. It's three grand, right? Yeah, yeah. Plus a $100 administration fee or something like that. I think you need a six month payment if you want it. Yeah, because it came with, and this didn't, this, I don't remember this happening when I originally joined, when my initiation fee is 1200 yeah.

Speaker 4:

[inaudible]

Speaker 6:

they sent the letter says you're welcome to join and another letter and literature for the Sag Credit Union. Okay, you can do it. You can get alone that I'm like, oh that's cool. That's cool.

Speaker 4:

Payment plan loan. Yeah.

Speaker 6:

I was talking to you but I was just talking to somebody who was thinking about kind of coming back or they weren't sure if they should join or not. Cause that'll, yeah. Almost to like must join. Is that right?

Speaker 4:

Yeah. There's a lot of people that are dealing with that. There's a lot of pre members that agents are friends are like no, no, no. This is the stay non union. That's where all the jobs are. Don't join right away cause then you can't, it's like Ah. Yeah we hear that from agents sometimes. It's like if you're most joined don't join cause I can't get your work. Yeah. He acts like an actor who would join with the payment plan but are credit scores too low so

Speaker 6:

you can't get the loan.

Speaker 4:

Ah Man. That is rough. Things in life. Yeah. But again, how does it, how does it feel cause you Kelly, you've been back for how long now? I can't count six years since murder.

Speaker 5:

Okay,

Speaker 4:

so you've been back for six years. Lolo has been back for a week and you're pretty much, you're right there.

Speaker 6:

So I'm not officially back. But like I think when I made the decision to don't do it, just like I felt like I could stand up straighter.

Speaker 4:

Guess that's what I'm saying. Like how did you feel just to get that monkey off your back? I'm just like, ah, I don't have to deal with any of this weird, icky, shitty feelings. Like you said before. Yeah. It just felt like, I don't know, I'm kind of like a weight was lifted then. I didn't realize that. I felt like a lot of Layton. Yeah,

Speaker 5:

complete shift in energy for me it was for sure the direction that I wanted to go. I wanted to go up. I wanted to get better, I wanted to climb my worth and where I want to go in my career. And that was really kind of weighing, weighing me down.

Speaker 4:

It's a tingling sensation, kind of a numbness. That means it's working. Yeah, exactly. You guys are commercialized. It was good. Yeah, because that's something that we haven't even just mentioned overall, but we keep hearing from like multiple that overall people that go ficor see their income overall income go down. Like that's again. So a lot of people are like, oh, it's financial corp. It's because I'm, my finances are bad or my financial situations bad. I'm going to go financial corp. Which that's not the right reason to do it, but a lot of their rationale for doing it or how they rationalize for themselves, it's like we're seeing that there's a few select few that maybe have supplemented their overall income, but most people see their stuff go down and it goes again to that stuff of you get pigeonholed as like you're the best nonunion actor we know for this job or whatever, and you get kind of pigeonholed by these gatekeepers. So that's another big reason not to. Yeah. Approximately three people that have had their careers go well, but I think they got lucky or they were well married or, yeah. Um, and then there and then some of them, their luck run out after a while. Yeah,

Speaker 5:

I think I would, I would so much rather hang back and I do feel like things are changing a bit but it's been pretty slow for me this year and that's me too. You know, abnormal for me, for me, for me, you know, whatever six Sam's girl is having trouble this year, auditions have definitely declined, but it reminds me of one. There are all kinds of other wonderful things I can do as an actor besides sit and wait for the phone to ring and it encourages me to get out and to do those other things and to have a really well rounded creative life. And I would rather hang back and wait for the phone to ring for a commercial audition and book that say one for a year or whatever, because that is worth its weight in gold for all of the reasons we understand, as opposed to doing 10, nine year in commercials,

Speaker 4:

right. When we've heard this too, where people, the rationalization of like, ah, it's for money or whatever. We hear this from all sides and it's a talking point for everyone, is you gotta do what you gotta do. I have a family, ah, I gotta do this. I gotta put food on the table, I've got a mortgage. Everyone understands that. The idea of that rationale or that excuse, but it's bullshit. It's total bullshit where it's like, we're not saying you can't do other jobs. You can do any job other than undermining the union job. You can cause again, like people have said, I'm toeing the line and I'm in dire straits and my wife has cancer, or our kid's sick, or our house burnt down and I'm towing the line. So your rationalization of like, oh, you gotta do what you gotta do and you're undermining the union.

Speaker 4:

It's like you're kind of spitting in my face. And then when I heard that from certain people that stood up and told their personal stories, I would never cross my, he and I would never go against that and I've had just as much hardship as the next person. Right. It just kind of hit home for me. I'm like, Holy Shit. That's right. Like that's what made me start this whole group because like literally when the fight core that's non union stuff started coming out and it was like 46,000 this and it went in my age. I go, what the fuck is going on? I want to get, I want some of that shit. Like if it's $64,000 job [inaudible] I want that. And he goes, yeah, but it's not an union. I want you to do that. And I was like, alright then I'm going to fucking do something my union and figure something out because I don't want to do that cause that sucks.

Speaker 4:

Right. So we're going to work. We're getting close to wrapping up. We need to wind down. We have two questions left. Yeah. I just, it's kind of a combo question, but I wanted you guys to give your advice to someone that's either one, it can be like two people cause I think there are kind of two different people that are in this fight, core world, one that scuffling, maybe they're brand new two, maybe they're out of high school or college and they're thinking about it or they're hearing from people to go buy courses. Someone that's thinking about going ficor. If you'd have any advice or something that we haven't mentioned so far or someone that's ficor right now that you're like, dude, come back, whatever. If you have any parting words or advice to these people, either that are thinking about it or people that are in it right now that are

Speaker 6:

dealing with it. My Buddy Tom always tells me the thing about five cars, it's just fool's gold and he's been right every time you said it. Even like when I was in fight car before I started thinking about coming back. But it's like I understood it, so I mean I would harp on that because it seems like we have talked about like a, I'm just going to get more work, I'm going to supplement my union income, and it just doesn't work out that way. Somebody like a pre member who lives in Minneapolis or some super small market with no plans of a necessarily moving to New York or la, I'd say, well, okay, then maybe you want to go find course so that you can do some union work when it comes around every couple of months. Yeah. But somebody here, it's like that's the goal. Yeah. To get in the union so you can get all the, uh, get the real goal though, you know, that's, I know that, that'd be my initial advice. And then let's, let's talk about it some more so I can kind of convince you some more. Right? Hmm. Like you said, talent is a commodity and if we can keep that from, those don't need jobs. If they really want a good actors for their spots, they're going to have to go union. Yeah. If we drained that talent pool. Exactly. Yeah. Power and power numbers.

Speaker 5:

[inaudible] oh, well gosh, I was like hoping you guys would talk longer.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 5:

I think I would just tell, you know, I love what Shannon said about fool's gold. That's exactly what it is. It may seem like there's a benefit or you know, supplementing and all those wonderful things, but it's just not true. It's, there's, um, a creative community that is film and television and you can't make it all just on your own. It's a collaboration and the union is a collaboration. We need all members and all people working together so that we can all make a fucking living. So I would say that maybe,

Speaker 4:

yeah, he's kind of interesting because it seems like the people that we see that really fight it and say, no, I'm going to, I go and do what I want. I'm going to do union and non union. It's somewhat narcissistic in the fact they want their face out there and they think of their faces on a bunch of commercials that they're going to get a TV show and then they're going to get famous and it's usually like, no, that's the exact opposite. It's going to happen. The directors, the director, when they see you, they're like, oh, you're a nonunion talent. They're not gonna think of you for their TV show or their movie. Yeah. Their big union commercial. Yeah. They won't. Yeah. Together we work. That's a phrase we always say together we work. We're not just one of us works or anything like that.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. Um, we could go on all day, but then this will wrap it up. Fantastic. Yes, we shall wrap it up. We have any partying. Well, I want to say thank you to the three of you for coming in. Yes, thank you. Thank you. Once again, we had Kelly penny graft, Lola Northrup and Shannon Holmes here. Very brave and awesome for you guys to come in and we should be clear that [inaudible] has a video about this topic on the union working channel on Youtube. She was one of the first to speak out, so we were super appreciative of hers. Yeah, probably just repeated a bunch of what I said on [inaudible] still good and a reminder, this was an unofficial discussion. The official manager in our Union of Financial Corp is a lovely staff person named CocoVia friends. She can be found at the phone number (323) 549-6019 and there are similar people at the other locals around the country. Follow us at union working on Facebook and our website. You didn't work in.com the union working podcast is produced in association with podcasts, sage at Culver city studios. Jackson. Amazing. We go, yes. And if you just have any questions or concerns about the topic, you can reach out to us at union working for [inaudible]. We're not mad at ya like we want you back. We want you back in the phone. You big hug. Yeah, we'll give you a big hug. Like

Speaker 2:

three. It's like I have mad respect for these people that quit hugging me. God, I need a nice kitchen, um, and came back and viewed. It feels great to have you guys back in the fold. Thank you. All right, bye. I think that's it. Make sure to download the next episode. I'd like to thank blue microphones there. Mike's are fantastic in their headphones. Killer, the gator case company. Your equipment can travel in style, protect your investment. Presonus I just love their studio. Live series, the Road Corporation, the film maker kits, ambisonic, microphone and recorders. All Rock and of course tascam. The model 24 has been amazing. Need music for a podcast, television project, film, audio book, or any other production need. I suggest you call my friends at spirit production music. You can find them and listen to their music at spirit production. music.com representing over 50 music libraries and over 200,000 tracks. Spirit production music has all the music you'll need staff to help and prices. You'll love. Email them through their website or give them a call today. At (818) 508-2040 that's (818) 508-2040 ask for my Buddy Ryan. He'll personally help you find the right music for your project. Spirit production, music.com check them out. You'll be thrilled.

Speaker 8:

[inaudible].

And we're back in Part 2!
What was the moment you wanted to come back?
How did you feel about being Fi-Core?
Shining some light on it
And we're back in part two of Part 2!
Coming back (Lowell)
Coming back (Shannon)
How does it feel to be back?
Your advice?
Closing remarks and thanks